All posts by sara@realafrica.co.uk

The 2019 wish-list (continued): mad about Malawi

Malawi is a rising star on the safari scene. Known as the ‘warm heart’ of Africa, visitors can enjoy idyllic lake shore stays along with exciting safari options,  ranging from ‘Big Five’ breaks in Majete to wild weekends in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve.

Malawi also offers adventure – climb Mt Mulanje, Malawi’s answer to Kilimanjaro. This huge slab of mountain south of Blantyre is surrounded by tea plantations and is incredibly scenic. Best explored on foot, there are trails suitable for all abilities, including 21 peaks to walk (or climb). Venture to Viphya for mountain biking and walks on the stunning plateau or Zomba, an 1800m high mountain range with forest, lakes, waterfalls and abundant wildlife.

Why go now? Malawi has transformed in recent years with concerted conservation efforts. Wildlife is thriving.  Black rhino have returned to Majete and cheetah to Liwonde (after an absence of 20 years). Lion were re-introduced in 2018,  while an ambitious elephant re-location was completed in a mission to see herds once more in Nkhotakota.

In Majete. tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors bringing valuable money to the reserve and communities. African Parks has maintained a 15 year track record of zero poaching of elephant and rhino. In Liwonde, numbers are up 25%.*

Quick Fire Malawi

shutterstock_554639089 national parks/wildlife reserves: Malawi has 5 national parks (Lake Malawi, Nyika, Liwonde, Kasungu, Lengwe) and 4 wildlife reserves (Nkhotakota, Majete, Vwasa, Mwabvi).

Here is a short guide to help you get to grips with Malawi:

Nyika National Park in the North is Malawi’s largest park with over 400 species of birds including Denham’s Bustard and the wattled crane and the highest density of leopard in central Africa. The park is especially good in the rainy season when wildflowers and orchids cover the plains. Varied scenery includes a waterfall and lake as well as a neolithic rock shelter. Chelinda Lodge  provides classic accommodation.

Liwonde11eLiwonde National Park in Malawi’s south is dominated by the Shire River and has an excellent population of  elephant as well as hippo, buffalo, zebra, crocodile and antelope. It is also now a sanctuary for more than a dozen black rhino. It was founded in 1973 and is one of Malawi’s most beautiful and most popular parks. Boat and 4×4 safaris are both excellent ways to explore. The river draws good numbers of elephant.  Mvuu Lodge and Camp on the River Shire’s bank offers four large ensuite tents and one stone and thatch honeymoon suite with views over the lagoon and there is also a natural rock hewn swimming pool. The camp has 12 units – a mix of stone and thatch chalets and family tents. Lovely Kuthengo Camp is a new addition to the park – a small seasonal tented camp, also on the river.

Robin Pope Safaris, Malawi
Robin Pope Safaris, Malawi

Majete, also located in the south has a fascinating back-story. It was once a prolific game refuge but by the 90s much of the big game had been eradicated due to poaching, logging and agriculture. But in 2003 African Parks  took over management of the reserve and it is now an inspiring model of sustainable development and biodiversity. Many different species have been reintroduced including lion, black rhino, elephant, antelope, zebra and leopard making this a Big Five destination once more.  Today there are more than 12,000 animals in Majete. We love Robin Pope Safaris new Mkulumadzi as a fantastic base for exploring the reserve.

Tongole
Tongole

Nkhotakota is Malawi’s oldest reserve and also under the management of African Parks. The beautiful Bua river flows at its heart. Dense rainforest gives way to miombo woodland rich with flora and fauna. The best way to see the reserve is by kayaking down the river or walking with a guide.  Birdlife is fantastic with over 280 species recorded,  and you may even be lucky enough to spot elephants coming to drink at the river or antelope in the woodland. Leopard and lion are more tricky to see.  Tongole Wilderness Lodge is a fantastic lodge, recently opened and nestled in the dense foilage. Open-fronted suites with panoramic views and raised decks allow you to soak up the majesty of the reserve.The park sits in the east of Malawi near the lake. Nkhotakota used to have more than 1,500 elephants but, after years of poaching, less than 100 of them remained. African Parks has successfully translocated 500 elephants from  Liwonde and Majete to Nkhotakota in recent years .

Kaya Mawa
Kaya Mawa

Lake Malawi: Malawi’s lake shore stretches some 500km. It is a paradise of small communities, sandy shores and small islands. Lake Malawi National Park was the very first freshwater national park declared as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984.  Cape Maclear, located on the southern shore of Lake Malawi, is the busiest resort on Lake Malawi with a wide range of accommodation to suit most tastes.. We like the simplicity of Mumbo Island, just a few kilometres off the coast, a good value, eco-friendly, rustic and laid back little lodge perfect for downtime. If you enjoy a few more luxuries then Pumulani Lodge is also in this area on the western side of Cape Maclear,  conveniently accessible via Lilongwe. Right on the north eastern shore of the lake is idyllic Likoma Island with its stunning beaches and luxurious accommodation in the form of Kaya Mawa. The lodge is beautifully designed. This is a special spot for relaxing, indulging and soaking up the dreamy views of the Mozambique coast just 40km away.

Practical points: British citizens require a visa to visit Malawi. (USD $75). Malaria is present  throughout Malawi so anti-malarials are recommended. The unit of currency is the Kwacha. The rainy season runs from November/December to March. Between April and October Malawi’s weather is perfect for holidaying offering cool nights, and warm clear days. There are currently no direct flights to Malawi. The main gateways of Lilongwe and Blantyre can be reached via Johannesburg (using South African Airways or BA to J’Burg) although depending on season and offers other routes are also available.

Malawi offers good value. One of the reasons for this is the relatively compact nature of the country and good network of tarmac roads ensuring guests can combine key areas easily. To give some idea of driving times in the south, please see below:

Lilongwe to Liwonde – approximately 4 hours

Lilongwe to the lake – approximately  3 hours.

The lake to Majete  – approximately 5 hours.

Majete to Blantyre – approximately 2 1/2 hours.

(Flights are also available with Ulendo Airlink,  for example Lilongwe to Likoma Island…)

Summary

Malawi is a fantastic and very rewarding holiday destination – you can enjoy a safari as well as time on the lake in one holiday. Malawi offers lovely weather from Easter right through to Halloween making it a good choice for families looking at getting away during the main holidays.  The people are incredibly warm and friendly and there is increasing choice when it comes to accommodation.

Malawi is an inspiration when it comes to conservation – wildlife continues to thrive; visitor numbers are on the increase and through eco-tourism,  more and more jobs are created for people in the community.

Because predator numbers in Malawi’s parks and reserves are not as high yet as in other safari destinations, we think Malawi is a hugely rewarding choice for repeat visitors to the continent, or to visit in combination with its wild neighbour, Zambia.

 

Find out more about holidays to Malawi, see sample itineraries,  or speak to us about travelling to Malawi on 01603 964 730.

*Source: African Parks

 

The 2019 wish-list (continued): walk on the wild side in Zambia

Zambia is an incredibly exciting destination offering the perfect blend of prime wilderness, outstanding wildlife and wonderful camps.

Luangwa Safari House
Luangwa Safari House

An exciting network of large and remote national parks provide plenty of opportunity for an immersive safari experience, from the oldest, Kafue, to the newest, Lower Zambezi.

This is a gem of a country where hospitality is warm, wildlife is awesome and scenery spectacular – we urge you to go.

When to go?

Dry Season
Dry Season

The long dry winter months April to October is the optimum time for a safari to Zambia. Days are warm and sunny and nights are cold. As the season progresses temperatures soar with October usually the hottest month. This is also when wildlife densities peak, as animals gather around the remaining water sources.  Riverside camps offer  a refreshing  breeze and superb sightings. Camps/lodges with pools are a good choice if travelling in the heat of October/November.

Mfuwe Lodge - the Emerald Season
Mfuwe Lodge – the Emerald Season

The long rains tend to arrive late November into December time and stay until March  – this can make unsealed roads impassable. However permanent camps are open year-round – the Emerald Season can be a very rewarding time to travel. I speak from first-hand experience having spent a week in the Luangwa one November just as the rains arrived – it was astounding to see the overnight transformation of the park. Wildlife was exceptional. Some camps depending on water levels offer safari by boat giving you a unique perspective.

Five reasons to add Zambia to your safari wish list

Walking in July
Walking in July
Nkwali
Nkwali
  • Walking safaris

South Luangwa has been the home of the walking safari. since the 1960s. Guiding is consistently high quality and quality bush camps ensure a top notch experience. You can easily spend a week here. walking between bush camps, or combining a few days walking with a lodge and 4×4 safari. Walking can be tailored to your needs but 8-10km per day between camps is what you can expect. Although South Luangwa offers the largest variety of walking safaris, you can also enjoy walking in Kafue and the Lower Zambezi.

This 8 day safari combines contrasting camps and includes a walking element along with a 4×4 safari in the South Luangwa.

Luangwa Bush Camp
Luangwa Bush Camp

Luangwa Bush Camp max1100x600

Busanga, Kafue
Busanga, Kafue
  • Nights under Canvas

Zambia offers incredible rustic bush camps. These vary in style.

During the peak dry season months of July to September you can spend a night or two of your safari in a mobile ‘fly camp’.

These fully serviced mobile camps are extremely comfortable and well-equipped with walk-in tents and full bedding. The ‘safari’ bucket shower is under a tree and the long-drop ‘bush loo’ has a wooden throne. Meals of a high standard are served under the open sky with just the glow of the camp fire and paraffin lamps.

Overlooking the Luwi River
Overlooking the Luwi River

Mobile camps allow visitors to access really remote areas where the wildlife is unused to people.

Zambia is also famous for its tented seasonal camps which open in April-May and are taken down at the end of the dry season in November.These camps, some with canvas and some with thatched roofs offer more facilities than the simpler mobile  ‘fly camps’ but are still incredibly rustic and positioned in low vehicle/prime wildlife areas. Robin Pope’s Tena Tena for instance is a cluster of six tents on the Luangwa River. Ensuite bathrooms are open-air. Power is provided by solar panels and fresh drinking water comes from a bore-hole. Time & Tide’s wonderful Luwi  is nestled in a grove of ancient mahogany trees, the tented suites designed to fully immerse guests into the bush experience. Set along the riverbed and overlooking the floodplains below, guests can watch the abundant wildlife right from the privacy of their own suite. Feathertop beds, an open air, ensuite bathroom and a peaceful seating area create a comfortable guest experience in this seasonal camp.

 

If you are not a fan of spending nights under canvas, you can opt for a permanent lodge or safari house. These have more facilities and creature comforts. Zambia has superb ‘safari houses’ perfect for groups of friends or family groups. These houses are fully staffed with driver/guide and cook – choose from large, luxurious riverside Chongwe River House with its amazing pool, to small Robin’s House complete with its own hide .

Canoeing the Chanel
Canoeing the Chanel
Boating from Chongwe River House
Boating from Chongwe River House
  • Canoeing the Zambezi

The Lower Zambezi is Zambia’s newest national park and sits bang opposite Mana Pools in Zimbabwe. If you like variety then this is the place to go – you can boat, walk, drive and fish, all with a beautiful mountain view and sublime wildlife. Canoe trips are exceptional allowing for very close encounters with large species like elephants who come to the river to refresh.  You can glide along silently without disturbing the wildlife.

As well as exploring by canoe, motorised boat trips provide the chance to explore larger tracts of the riverside.

Combined with walking and 4×4 safaris this is a wonderful way to experience the richness and diversity of Zambia’s national park network.

Victoria Falls in the Emerald Season
Victoria Falls in the Emerald Season
  • Victoria Falls/Livingstone

No trip to Zambia would be complete without a visit to the Falls. Livingstone is the town on the Zambian side of the Falls where many activities such as rafting can be organised. A number of stunning river lodges stretch along the river bank upstream from the Falls. Lodges provide complimentary transfers for guests to the Falls with some also offering activities such as river cruises. These lodges are a wonderful choice for pre or post safari R&R. An increasing network of domestic light aircraft flights connects several of Zambia’s key attractions with the main gateways of Lusaka and Livingstone meaning you can combine parks such as the Lower Zambezi and Mfuwe in the South Luangwa more easily than ever before.

Wild Dogs
Wild Dogs
  • Endangered species – wild dogs rule

Visitors to Zambia can enjoy spectacular wildlife including the chance to see many rare and iconic species. The Zambian Carnivore Programme recently announced that the South Luangwa National Park is now officially home to Zambia’s largest African wild dog population. Despite being one of Africa’s most endangered carnivores, wild dogs in and around the South Luangwa National Park have enjoyed several years of increasing numbers, and there are now estimated to be approximately 350 adults and yearlings living in the Luangwa Valley.

 

To find out more about Zambia’s national parks, you may be interested to read our country guide here.

You’ll also find sample safaris, with price guides.

 

 

 

The 2019 wish-list (continued): bedazzled by Botswana

Thinking of a holiday to Botswana? Here’s what you need to know!

Botswana, in a nutshell offers:

  • small camps, most often in private concessions
  • a range of activities  including 4×4 safaris, walking, horse riding, canoeing and boating, fishing, birding, mobile/fly camping
  • a fantastic array of wildlife, including the opportunity to see many rare and endangered species
  • diversity of landscape –  combine the arid salt pans of the Kalahari Desert with the islands and channels of the Okavango Delta

Five Rivers Bots NxaiPan2Also in Botswana’s favour is the negligible time change – it’s just GMT + 2 hours.

For those seeking some R&R pre or post Botswana safari we recommend the beautiful river lodges close to Victoria Falls but there are additional options, depending on budget, for example you can combine Botswana and South Africa very easily.

K&D Bots sundownersBotswana Okavango Delta smallThe question of budget

If you are looking for pristine wildlife areas to explore with very few other guests and vehicles, along with quality guiding and lodging then Botswana delivers. This is a destination which prides itself on low density, high quality eco-tourism.

Travelling out of high season (the dry winter months of July to September when wildlife densities are at a peak) will give you access to lower rates. Best rates and availability can be found during the Green Season (lush summer months of December to March), although not all camps are open throughout this period.

Safari packages are all-inclusive,  from food and drink, activities and guiding to your laundry so the cost of your holiday is all paid before you leave home.

You can see further sample safari itineraries and explore price guides here.

shutterstock_203430058Getting there

Botswana’s reputation for exclusivity comes largely down to accessibility – small luxury camps/lodges hide away in wonderfully remote locations and many are only accessible by light aircraft/helicopter, either from the main gateways of Maun and Kasane or as inter-camp transfers, which we arrange for you as part of a safari package.

There are currently no direct flights to Botswana – the vast majority of our clients fly direct to Johannesburg in South Africa, from where there are good reliable connections with SA Airlink on to Maun or Kasane. As a very rough guide, you should budget c£675-£1100 per person for economy flights via Johannesburg to Maun, depending on season, availability and special offers.

It is also possible to arrive into Victoria Falls with c3 hour road transfer to the Chobe lodges,  via Kasane. Because Chobe is accessible by road it is the most popular (and the most economical) of Botswana’s key attractions.

 

Zarafa_GuestTentExteriorSunset_May2009 XUDUMa-botswana-safari-at-andbeyond-xudum-okavango-delta-lodge-23.jpg.950x0 WEBshinde leopard cubs ker and downey mar 15Why Botswana excels as a safari destination

Private Concessions – low density, high quality safari experiences

Visitor numbers are strictly limited in private concessions. Individual camps normally have less than a dozen or so camps/rooms. This means very few vehicles, minimal erosion/vehicle tracks in the bush and little environmental impact. These factors all contribute to the quality of guest safari experience.

Conservation 

Botswana has enjoyed more than 50 years of independence and in this time it has stood out for its consistent commitment to conservation and eco-tourism, particularly in the last decade with the leadership of President Ian Khama.

Khama, a keen conservationist,  introduced a ban on sport hunting in 2014 to help safeguard large species, however the policy is being reviewed by the new President.

Botswana has shown that given space and safety, rare species thrive, including critically endangered black rhino, wild dog,  black maned Kalahari lion, lechwe, puku, sitatunga, pangolin and aardvark.

  • Spotlight on Black Rhino

The ambitious rhino relocation to the Okavango Delta is just one compelling reason to travel to Botswana. The Moremi Game Reserve on the eastern edge of the Okavango Delta, the world’s largest inland delta and the 1000th UNESCO World Heritage site, is now a place that guests can see all the Big Five once again thanks to the efforts of conservation partners.

It’s a real privilege to be able to observe black rhino in the wild with only around 5,000 remaining in Africa. Guests can add a new dimension to their travels by enjoying a behind-the-scenes conservation experience – at certain camps it is possible to meet rhino monitoring teams to learn more about the rhino’s return to the Okavango.

Through our Explorers against Extinction charity campaign we have supported the work of Rhino Conservation Botswana, funding and equipping two rhino protection dogs, Primaa and Savas.

WWDumaTau_2014-06-99 GameDriveEles CGL 10134 MokoroGuests Xak 10392Activities

A fantastic diversity of activities from 4×4 game drives, by day and night, to walking and horseback safaris and boat excursions help guests get under the skin of Botswana.

Float serenely by mokoro down the Okavango Delta’s maze of papyrus edged channels, safari in Chobe National Park, dubbed ‘Land of Giants’ where more than 120,000 elephants roam, canoe the remote Selinda Spillway, fly camping on deserted islands as you go, walk with San Bushmen in the desolate Kalahari, the largest, most remotely situated reserve in Southern Africa, marvel at magical starry southern skies, visit the mysterious Savute region or witness the zebra migrations from the Chobe River and the border with Namibia to Nxai and Makgadikgadi pans,  the longest-known terrestrial wildlife migration in Africa.

Desert or Delta?

The ideal safari combines both desert and delta experiences.

The vast Kalahari Salt Pans include Tau Pan, Nxai Pan, Makgadikgadi and the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. As a general rule these areas start to blossom following the summer rains which tend to arrive in November/December time and last until March.

The Delta encompasses the Okavango, Chobe and Moremi and can be visited year-round although wildlife densities peak in the winter months of July-September as the water sources dry up. Most of our guests travel between April and October.

Chobe is split into three main areas (Riverfront; Savuti and Linyanti). The Riverfront and Forest Reserve (above the river) can be accessed very economically by road from Kasane (as noted above). Most other destinations are accessed by light aircraft transfer.

Safari inspiration

To explore a whole range of different safari holidays in Botswana, as well as those combining Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe/Zambia with Bostwana please click here.

Camps/Lodges

There are many different camps/lodges – you can stay in seasonal mobile camps with a real stripped back ‘explorer’ feel, permanent tented camps or more traditional lodge style accommodation with thatched/reed roofs, doors and windows – some of these will also offer air-conditioning.

Combining the camps/lodges of one ‘brand’ into a circuit tends to offer best value – these include but are not limited to Ker & Downey, Kwando, Desert & Delta, Wilderness, Great Plains, Under One Sky, African Bush Camps, Machaba.

Splash-Camp_Pool kadizoraballoon_crop600x400 Cheetah Moremi K&D IMG-20170129-WA0028-800x533What’s new in Botswana going into 2019?

Splash Camp opened in 2018 and is the newest addition to the Kwando family of camps (Lagoon, Lebala, Kwara, Little Kwara).

Ker & Downey’s Kanana Camp will re-open in April 2019 with a brand new look. The camp is currently enjoying a refurbishment. Dinaka opened in 2018 giving guests the option of combining properties in the Okavango (Okuti, Kanana, Shinde) with the Kalahari (Dinaka).

Wilderness has been busy expanding and enhancing its portfolio in Bostwana, particularly its Premier Camps. Jao Camp is the latest to receive a makeover and will be upgraded complete with new Jao Villas, opening in June 2019.  Mombo/Little Mombo  unveiled its brand new look last year in addition to luxurious King’s Pool, Linyanti. At last count there were over 20 Wilderness camps in Bostwana giving incredible choice at this luxury level.

Machaba Safaris are a new addition with Machaba, Gomoti Plains and Sable Alley.

Hot air ballooning is brand new for the Okavango, from Kadizora Camp.

We also have some fantastic new family safari options including a trip with Kwando, staying in family configured tents. Other family options include Desert and Delta and Ker & Downey (both offer 2 bedroom tents/units). These are great for families with children over 7 years old.

Explore Botswana in more detail using our information pages here.

Speak to someone with first-hand experience and in depth knowledge – call 01603 964 730 or email paul@realafrica.co.uk

To see our excellent client reviews please click here.

Coming next…Zambia.

 

The 2019 wish-list (continued): Tanzania’s time to shine

‘Beests, beaches & natural bounty

Tanzania epitomises ‘safari’ Africa. Whether it’s a herd of elephant crossing in front of you, a stampede of wildebeest or a perfectly framed giraffe and acacia in the sunset, the scale of the place,  and the sheer beauty of its natural bounty cannot fail to impress.

For a holiday, Tanzania is a smart option – there is very little time change (GMT+3hrs) so you don’t spend all your time off feeling scrambled,  it’s accessible for much of the year, depending on what you want to do and where you want to visit, and there’s great variety – you can climb a mountain, enjoy safari on foot, bicycle and by 4WD, spend nights under canvas or in luxury lodges,  head for the beaches or escape to the hills.

elephants- julianPicture 073Dhow on ZNZ beachThe Northern Circuit parks (Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Manyara and Tarangire) are a great destination for families  and first-time visitors. Your journey includes descending steep crater walls to the floor of the iconic Ngorongoro Crater. Our tip – don’t try to do too much if short on time and if budget allows – fly back from the Serengeti (…and on to the beaches of Zanzibar!)  The south offers vast reserves (Selous and Ruaha) where traffic density is very low and wildlife encounters are hugely rewarding. We also organise fly-in safaris to the remote western area of Tanzania (Mahale and Gombe) for adventurous chimp trekking  or if adventure is what you seek – how about  climbing Kilimanjaro?

Tanzania has been out of the spotlight for the last couple of years –  the governments decision to impose 18% tourism tax on services previously exempt from tax, with only a few weeks notice back in July 2016,  was undoubtedly damaging to visitor numbers.

However, a couple of years on and things have settled. Tanzania has seen new camps/lodges open, there are some competitive airfares, with airlines like Qatar flying into Kilimanjaro (Arusha) and Zanzibar, there’s a new online visa system and efforts continue to safeguard migration corridors and protect wildlife.

25% of Tanzania’s land is protected and the growth and success of eco-tourism is hugely important to not only the wildlife, but to local communities.

With such an undeniable bounty of natural riches, we see Tanzania coming back strong in 2019.

Here are five reasons to include this spectacular country on your travel radar:

WWshutterstock_1395341961.The Wildlife IMG_2192Tanzania has the largest concentration of animals in Africa – we’re talking 4 million wild animals. The Serengeti is a must-visit for a dizzying diversity of species, including an impressive list of predators. Rhino remain hard to see but they are there – you may be lucky and get a glimpse in the  Moro Kopjes area, or in the neighbouring Ngorongoro.

Tarangire is the best place for huge impressive herds of elephants while the west of the country is where you can search for primates in the beautiful Mahale Mountains or world-famous Gombe National Park, where Dr Jane Goodall has been so influential in the conservation of chimpanzees.

Long beaked common dolphins shutterstock_527159677Marine reserves around the Spice Islands offer safe haven for turtles, rays, dolphins, whales and other species. Whether you want a Robinson Crusoe meets Jacques Cousteau experience at somewhere like Pemba or Mafia Island, or to relax on the soft sands of Zanzibar watching the dhows sail by plus a night or two in atmospheric Stone Town, Tanzania offers plenty of opportunity to dip your toes in the Indian Ocean.

2.The Great Migration

WWshutterstock_221791825For 75% of the year, the annual Wildebeest Migration roams the Serengeti and Greater Ngorongoro Conservation Area. This is the world’s longest overland migration and involves 1.5 million animals. The river crossings in the northern Serengeti mark the pinnacle of the migration rewarding visitors with dramatic scenes akin to television documentaries. This experience is sure to get the heart thumping. Find out more>>>

 

DSC_00863.The Roof of Africa – Kilimanjaro

Majestic Kili at 5,895m is Africa’s highest peak and the world’s highest walkable mountain. Gaze in awe at its snow-capped peak or become one of the 25,000 trekkers scaling its slippery slopes annually.

4.The Spice Islands 

mnemba-island-lodge-51.jpg.950x0Safari and beach is a dream holiday combo and in Tanzania you are truly spoilt for choice. For those exploring the northern circuit safari parks (Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Manyara, Tarangire), a few days on Zanzibar or Pemba pre or post safari works a dream. For those further south in the Selous or Ruaha, opt for Mafia Island, or stay on the beautiful mainland coast at somewhere like Ras Kutani. Find out more>>>

RA fleet & drivers Kenya DSC_71105.The People

There are over 160 different tribes living in Tanzania. Getting to know a bit about the local customs and culture is a major part of a trip to Tanzania – you’ll find the people warm and incredibly hospitable. The best way to get to grips with the Northern Circuit parks is to head off in your own private 4WD with a driver/guide. All our guides are local and take great pride in introducing you to their country.

Thinking of a holiday to Tanzania? It couldn’t be easier – just give us a ring on 01603 964 730 or email your enquiry to paul@realafrica.co.uk

To find out more about holidays to Tanzania you may like to browse the information pages on our website.

The Northern Circuit Three Ways:

On a Shoestring ?  See Small Group Escorted Safari here.

Looking for luxury? See sample Tanzania in Luxury Safari here.

For the Ultimate Tanzania Safari please click here.

 

webDSC_0756Easy-peasey-visa

Tanzania now offers an easy online visa application service – single entry visas are $50USD and can be paid online with a credit card.

Find out more here.

  • New for 2019

There has been a crop of new camps and lodges open in Tanzania, strengthening the offering and increasing choice for visitors. You may be interested in the following:

Lemala-Mpingo-RidgeTarangire

Lemala Mpingo Ridge Tented Camp –

We are very excited about this addition to the Lemala portfolio allowing guests to combine Lemala properties in the Serengeti, Ngorongoro and Tarangire.  Each of the 15 spacious tented suites have been carefully positioned to maximize  views over Tarangire. All offer en-suite bathrooms, private decks, sunken outside lounges that convert to afternoon siesta beds and one of the suites has two bedrooms, perfect for families.
The elevated main lodge has a large lounge and bar, indoor and outdoor dining areas, a spa and swimming pool. Sundowners, early morning walks and game drives in new custom-designed vehicles accompanied by Lemala’s highly-knowledgeable and experienced guides are some of the activities guests can look forward to during their stay.
Serengeti
Lemala Nanyukie Camp opened to guests in October 2018 and is located a 45-minute drive east of the Seronera Airstrip in the park’s central region, and is superbly located with outstanding views across the plains. The camp itself sits on a grassy savanna dotted with rocky kopjes and shaded by ancient giant acacia trees. There are just 15 guest tents.
Melia Serengeti Lodge – this is the first state-of-the-art sustainable hotel by MHI, and the hotel of around 50 rooms offers ‘off the grid’ living and a great viewpoint for the annual migration. This new -ish property suits people not keen on tented camps and after a few more facilities. It’s a lot bigger than most of the properties we tend to offer but we like the commitment to sustainability.
Kati Kati galeria_KT_3Kati Kati Mara/Ndutu camps are solar-powered stripped back ‘explorer style’ mobile camps complete with safari bucket showers. The camps are positioned to get you to the heart of the action and move seasonally for the Great Migration. Kati Kati Mara is located in northern Serengeti for the river crossings (Jun – Oct/Nov) and Ndutu is in the southern Serengeti for wildebeest calving season (Dec – Mar). There are 11 tents plus one family tent.
Zuri 2018-07-19-02-56-03-d4faa8f0e1c1273dfe6f57055dba72ff Zuri Beach 2018-07-19-02-58-22-19865dd2e9da80604e2e30d2a475c65bZanzibar
Zuri Zanzibar opened in summer 2018 and offers guests access to one of the most beautiful (and non tidal) beaches on Zanzibar, Kendwa Beach.  Zuri sits on the north-west shore around 50km from Stone Town. There are 55 suites, villas and bungalows with sunset views. This would be great for a few days after a safari or as a week long holiday in its own right.
Yes please!
>>>Up next…Botswana

 

 

The 2019 wish-list: top five safari destinations to explore in 2019

Over the next few weeks we’ll focus on five different safari destinations worthy of making your 2019 wish-list. We’ll look at new camps, lodges and activities and give you ideas for amazing holidays in 2019. 

This week – it’s Zimbabwe.

1.ZIMBABWE

Kanga-Camp-Mana-Pools-Zimbabwe-African-Bush-Camps-Safari-Tented-Camp-Main-Area-2-1200x750Kanga Camp, Mana Pools

Zimbabwe is firmly back on the safari map with a more stable political climate, investment going into developing its tourism infrastructure and the Univisa making holidaying in both Zimbabwe and Zambia easier.

This land-locked country in Southern Africa offers magnificent wilderness , exceptional guiding and a fantastic array of activities. You can canoe the Zambezi, walk in Mana Pools, zipline over Victoria Falls and stake out a waterhole from a hide in Hwange in the space of a 10 day -two week trip.

Prime safari areas are easily accessed via the international gateways of Victoria Falls and Harare. The best time to go is between May and September although many of the camps are open from April to mid November.

Find out more about Zimbabwe and see sample safaris here.

Call us on 01603 964 730 or email enquiries@realafrica.co.uk to discuss a safari to Zimbabwe.

Mana Pools

Rukomechi287There’s a real buzz about Zimbabwe as we start 2019, and especially beautiful Mana Pools.

If you saw the BBC Dynasties episode on the Painted Wolves of Mana then you’ll have some idea why this World Heritage national park has attracted so much attention in recent months.

This wild and beautiful region is only accessible during the dry season (April to November) there are very few vehicle tracks and only a handful of safari camps.

Activities include walking, canoeing and 4WD safaris with wildlife viewing off-the-scale. The area is very well-known for its large bull elephants – encounters can be thrilling (especially on foot) – as well as a full cast of predators.

Well-established owner/run camps such as Vundu Camp where wild dog expert Nick Murray who appeared on the Dynasties episode is based, or Goliath Camp, home of Stretch Ferreira stand the test of time with emphasis firmly on quality guiding.

2017 saw the opening of John’s Camp,  and Zambezi Expeditions and Kanga Camp from African Bush Camps.

2018 sees further new camps with each one below having a strong focus on responsible travel and conservation.

1.Chikwenya

Chikwenya large_focal_g4310-chikwenyaChikwenya is part of the Wilderness Safaris portfolio of camps and lodges. The camp has always been in this magical position on the far eastern boundary of Mana overlooking the Zambezi but in autumn 2018 it opened with a completely new look. There are just seven glorious tented suites  complete with outdoor showers, with two family units to follow in Spring 2019. Activities range from walking and boating to day and night drives. A stay here would work well with one of its sister properties in Mana, Ruckomechi or Little Ruckomechi on the western boundary or with one of the excellent Wilderness camps in Hwange (Davisons. Linkwasha, Little Makalolo). The camps are all accessed by nearby airstrips and the services of Wilderness Air. Enjoy a 5% long-stay discount on 6 night+ safaris in any combination of their Zim camps/lodges for stays until 31 May and from 1 Nov 2019 (subject to availability – special dates apply).

2.Nyamatusi

Nyamatusi-Campmain-area-outside-Mana-Pools-National-Park-Zimbabwe-5Owner-run African Bush Camps is due to open six suite Nyamatusi Camp in April 2019 giving clients three wonderful but very different camps to choose from in Mana Pools. Nyamatusi is a luxury option in a private concession in the eastern area of Mana with all suites offering plunge pools and wonderful views.  We love ABCs new Wild Dogs of Zimbabwe itinerary which splits time in Mana between Kanga Camp and Mana Expedition Camp,  a characterful mobile camp on the banks of the Zambezi. The itinerary also visits Somalisa Expedition Camp in Hwange and Thorntree River Lodge on the Zambian side of Victoria Falls.

3. Greater Mana Expedition Camp

Greater Mana great-plains-manaexpedition-gallery-13Great Plains Conservation also now offers an exciting itinerary option in Zimbabwe with the opening of Mpala Jena close to Victoria Falls. Mpala Jena has just four tented suites, and works brilliantly in combination with Greater Mana Expedition Camp in the private Sapi Reserve on the eastern boundary of Mana Pools. Mana Expedition hosts a maximum of six guests and the emphasis is very much on activity and adventure in this pristine and beautiful environment.

Here are some other new camps/lodges in Zimbabwe to look out for and consider for your holiday:

Matusadona/Lake Kariba

Bumi-Hills-Safariimbabwe_Luxury-Safari-Lodge_Lake-View_Viewing-Deck_-African-Bush-Camps-88-1200x662Bumi Hills reopened in 2018 after an extensive refurbishment. There are ten suites with spectacular lake views. Lake cruises, walking safaris and game drives are all on the agenda. This is a stunning spot to simply relax and admire the colours changing over Lake Kariba. One of the highlights of any visit to Matusadona is learning about rhino conservation here and the background and success of the Intensive Rhino Protection Zone.  Other well-established options in the Lake Kariba/Matusadona area include Changa Safari Camp and Rhino Safari Camp.

Hwange

Verneys MachabaSafaris-verneys-camp-gallery-13Verney’s Camp is a new opening in Hwange and sits in a private concession within the south-eastern zone of the national park – a low traffic area. This classic tented camp, part of Machaba Safaris is an exciting prospect and offers eight tented rooms plus a further two family rooms. All tented rooms look out to the waterhole in front of the camp. Verney’s further strengthens the excellent camp offering in Hwange which can be reached very easily by road from Victoria Falls – the main gate is around a 2 1/2 hour drive away. There is also an airstrip for fly-in safari access,  but road transfers, especially if travelling in a group or as a family, give flexibility and allow you to have more freedom with your baggage! Fly in safaris impose very strict baggage guidelines!  Road transfers also help to keep the cost down while  allowing you to see more of the country. The Hide Hwange remains a favourite option with the waterhole very close to camp  along with Camp Hwange and Davison’s. African Bush Camps offer three high quality options with Somalisa, family friendly Somalisa Acacia and Somalisa Expedition. Some camps offer the chance to get a behind-the-scenes conservation experience with visits to the Painted Dog Conservation Centre or by joining a Hwange Pump Run. Find out more about Hwange here.

Victoria Falls

ZimZam slider shutterstock_129335261There are dozens of places to stay in Victoria Falls – you can stay in an economical  guesthouse in town,  a colonial grand hotel with lawns rolling virtually down to the Falls, a safari lodge or a river lodge. Victoria Falls is a great place to arrive and relax following an international flight. It’s a good destination for families with many exciting activities on offer, for example the Flying Fox or canopy tours. Victoria Falls combines brilliantly with a safari to Hwange since you can transfer easily and affordably by road, or with Chobe in Botswana. In the last year several new properties have opened around Victoria Falls.  At the top end is spectacular Mpala Jena from Great Plains.  Old Drift Lodge is also new, around 7km upstream of Victoria Falls on the banks of the Zambezi. The lodge is owned by Wild Horizons who also offer The Elephant Camp at Victoria Falls. The tented lodge opened in May 2018 so has had a season to settle in. There are 10 suites here plus an additional four family suites. As well as being able to enjoy river cruises and game drives on the banks of the Zambezi, guests are close enough to visit the Falls themselves and enjoy some of the many activities. Masuwe Lodge is in a similar location and has re-opened after extensive refurbishment. You can also stay on the Zambian side of the Falls – known for its beautiful river lodges – great places to kick back pre or post safari and to get out on the water, but you’ll have to wait to read the blog on Zambia…

Next week: why a holiday to Tanzania should be on your wish-list.