Tag Archives: Victoria Falls

The 2019 wish-list (continued): walk on the wild side in Zambia

Zambia is an incredibly exciting destination offering the perfect blend of prime wilderness, outstanding wildlife and wonderful camps.

Luangwa Safari House
Luangwa Safari House

An exciting network of large and remote national parks provide plenty of opportunity for an immersive safari experience, from the oldest, Kafue, to the newest, Lower Zambezi.

This is a gem of a country where hospitality is warm, wildlife is awesome and scenery spectacular – we urge you to go.

When to go?

Dry Season
Dry Season

The long dry winter months April to October is the optimum time for a safari to Zambia. Days are warm and sunny and nights are cold. As the season progresses temperatures soar with October usually the hottest month. This is also when wildlife densities peak, as animals gather around the remaining water sources.  Riverside camps offer  a refreshing  breeze and superb sightings. Camps/lodges with pools are a good choice if travelling in the heat of October/November.

Mfuwe Lodge - the Emerald Season
Mfuwe Lodge – the Emerald Season

The long rains tend to arrive late November into December time and stay until March  – this can make unsealed roads impassable. However permanent camps are open year-round – the Emerald Season can be a very rewarding time to travel. I speak from first-hand experience having spent a week in the Luangwa one November just as the rains arrived – it was astounding to see the overnight transformation of the park. Wildlife was exceptional. Some camps depending on water levels offer safari by boat giving you a unique perspective.

Five reasons to add Zambia to your safari wish list

Walking in July
Walking in July
Nkwali
Nkwali
  • Walking safaris

South Luangwa has been the home of the walking safari. since the 1960s. Guiding is consistently high quality and quality bush camps ensure a top notch experience. You can easily spend a week here. walking between bush camps, or combining a few days walking with a lodge and 4×4 safari. Walking can be tailored to your needs but 8-10km per day between camps is what you can expect. Although South Luangwa offers the largest variety of walking safaris, you can also enjoy walking in Kafue and the Lower Zambezi.

This 8 day safari combines contrasting camps and includes a walking element along with a 4×4 safari in the South Luangwa.

Luangwa Bush Camp
Luangwa Bush Camp

Luangwa Bush Camp max1100x600

Busanga, Kafue
Busanga, Kafue
  • Nights under Canvas

Zambia offers incredible rustic bush camps. These vary in style.

During the peak dry season months of July to September you can spend a night or two of your safari in a mobile ‘fly camp’.

These fully serviced mobile camps are extremely comfortable and well-equipped with walk-in tents and full bedding. The ‘safari’ bucket shower is under a tree and the long-drop ‘bush loo’ has a wooden throne. Meals of a high standard are served under the open sky with just the glow of the camp fire and paraffin lamps.

Overlooking the Luwi River
Overlooking the Luwi River

Mobile camps allow visitors to access really remote areas where the wildlife is unused to people.

Zambia is also famous for its tented seasonal camps which open in April-May and are taken down at the end of the dry season in November.These camps, some with canvas and some with thatched roofs offer more facilities than the simpler mobile  ‘fly camps’ but are still incredibly rustic and positioned in low vehicle/prime wildlife areas. Robin Pope’s Tena Tena for instance is a cluster of six tents on the Luangwa River. Ensuite bathrooms are open-air. Power is provided by solar panels and fresh drinking water comes from a bore-hole. Time & Tide’s wonderful Luwi  is nestled in a grove of ancient mahogany trees, the tented suites designed to fully immerse guests into the bush experience. Set along the riverbed and overlooking the floodplains below, guests can watch the abundant wildlife right from the privacy of their own suite. Feathertop beds, an open air, ensuite bathroom and a peaceful seating area create a comfortable guest experience in this seasonal camp.

 

If you are not a fan of spending nights under canvas, you can opt for a permanent lodge or safari house. These have more facilities and creature comforts. Zambia has superb ‘safari houses’ perfect for groups of friends or family groups. These houses are fully staffed with driver/guide and cook – choose from large, luxurious riverside Chongwe River House with its amazing pool, to small Robin’s House complete with its own hide .

Canoeing the Chanel
Canoeing the Chanel
Boating from Chongwe River House
Boating from Chongwe River House
  • Canoeing the Zambezi

The Lower Zambezi is Zambia’s newest national park and sits bang opposite Mana Pools in Zimbabwe. If you like variety then this is the place to go – you can boat, walk, drive and fish, all with a beautiful mountain view and sublime wildlife. Canoe trips are exceptional allowing for very close encounters with large species like elephants who come to the river to refresh.  You can glide along silently without disturbing the wildlife.

As well as exploring by canoe, motorised boat trips provide the chance to explore larger tracts of the riverside.

Combined with walking and 4×4 safaris this is a wonderful way to experience the richness and diversity of Zambia’s national park network.

Victoria Falls in the Emerald Season
Victoria Falls in the Emerald Season
  • Victoria Falls/Livingstone

No trip to Zambia would be complete without a visit to the Falls. Livingstone is the town on the Zambian side of the Falls where many activities such as rafting can be organised. A number of stunning river lodges stretch along the river bank upstream from the Falls. Lodges provide complimentary transfers for guests to the Falls with some also offering activities such as river cruises. These lodges are a wonderful choice for pre or post safari R&R. An increasing network of domestic light aircraft flights connects several of Zambia’s key attractions with the main gateways of Lusaka and Livingstone meaning you can combine parks such as the Lower Zambezi and Mfuwe in the South Luangwa more easily than ever before.

Wild Dogs
Wild Dogs
  • Endangered species – wild dogs rule

Visitors to Zambia can enjoy spectacular wildlife including the chance to see many rare and iconic species. The Zambian Carnivore Programme recently announced that the South Luangwa National Park is now officially home to Zambia’s largest African wild dog population. Despite being one of Africa’s most endangered carnivores, wild dogs in and around the South Luangwa National Park have enjoyed several years of increasing numbers, and there are now estimated to be approximately 350 adults and yearlings living in the Luangwa Valley.

 

To find out more about Zambia’s national parks, you may be interested to read our country guide here.

You’ll also find sample safaris, with price guides.

 

 

 

The 2019 wish-list: top five safari destinations to explore in 2019

Over the next few weeks we’ll focus on five different safari destinations worthy of making your 2019 wish-list. We’ll look at new camps, lodges and activities and give you ideas for amazing holidays in 2019. 

This week – it’s Zimbabwe.

1.ZIMBABWE

Kanga-Camp-Mana-Pools-Zimbabwe-African-Bush-Camps-Safari-Tented-Camp-Main-Area-2-1200x750Kanga Camp, Mana Pools

Zimbabwe is firmly back on the safari map with a more stable political climate, investment going into developing its tourism infrastructure and the Univisa making holidaying in both Zimbabwe and Zambia easier.

This land-locked country in Southern Africa offers magnificent wilderness , exceptional guiding and a fantastic array of activities. You can canoe the Zambezi, walk in Mana Pools, zipline over Victoria Falls and stake out a waterhole from a hide in Hwange in the space of a 10 day -two week trip.

Prime safari areas are easily accessed via the international gateways of Victoria Falls and Harare. The best time to go is between May and September although many of the camps are open from April to mid November.

Find out more about Zimbabwe and see sample safaris here.

Call us on 01603 964 730 or email enquiries@realafrica.co.uk to discuss a safari to Zimbabwe.

Mana Pools

Rukomechi287There’s a real buzz about Zimbabwe as we start 2019, and especially beautiful Mana Pools.

If you saw the BBC Dynasties episode on the Painted Wolves of Mana then you’ll have some idea why this World Heritage national park has attracted so much attention in recent months.

This wild and beautiful region is only accessible during the dry season (April to November) there are very few vehicle tracks and only a handful of safari camps.

Activities include walking, canoeing and 4WD safaris with wildlife viewing off-the-scale. The area is very well-known for its large bull elephants – encounters can be thrilling (especially on foot) – as well as a full cast of predators.

Well-established owner/run camps such as Vundu Camp where wild dog expert Nick Murray who appeared on the Dynasties episode is based, or Goliath Camp, home of Stretch Ferreira stand the test of time with emphasis firmly on quality guiding.

2017 saw the opening of John’s Camp,  and Zambezi Expeditions and Kanga Camp from African Bush Camps.

2018 sees further new camps with each one below having a strong focus on responsible travel and conservation.

1.Chikwenya

Chikwenya large_focal_g4310-chikwenyaChikwenya is part of the Wilderness Safaris portfolio of camps and lodges. The camp has always been in this magical position on the far eastern boundary of Mana overlooking the Zambezi but in autumn 2018 it opened with a completely new look. There are just seven glorious tented suites  complete with outdoor showers, with two family units to follow in Spring 2019. Activities range from walking and boating to day and night drives. A stay here would work well with one of its sister properties in Mana, Ruckomechi or Little Ruckomechi on the western boundary or with one of the excellent Wilderness camps in Hwange (Davisons. Linkwasha, Little Makalolo). The camps are all accessed by nearby airstrips and the services of Wilderness Air. Enjoy a 5% long-stay discount on 6 night+ safaris in any combination of their Zim camps/lodges for stays until 31 May and from 1 Nov 2019 (subject to availability – special dates apply).

2.Nyamatusi

Nyamatusi-Campmain-area-outside-Mana-Pools-National-Park-Zimbabwe-5Owner-run African Bush Camps is due to open six suite Nyamatusi Camp in April 2019 giving clients three wonderful but very different camps to choose from in Mana Pools. Nyamatusi is a luxury option in a private concession in the eastern area of Mana with all suites offering plunge pools and wonderful views.  We love ABCs new Wild Dogs of Zimbabwe itinerary which splits time in Mana between Kanga Camp and Mana Expedition Camp,  a characterful mobile camp on the banks of the Zambezi. The itinerary also visits Somalisa Expedition Camp in Hwange and Thorntree River Lodge on the Zambian side of Victoria Falls.

3. Greater Mana Expedition Camp

Greater Mana great-plains-manaexpedition-gallery-13Great Plains Conservation also now offers an exciting itinerary option in Zimbabwe with the opening of Mpala Jena close to Victoria Falls. Mpala Jena has just four tented suites, and works brilliantly in combination with Greater Mana Expedition Camp in the private Sapi Reserve on the eastern boundary of Mana Pools. Mana Expedition hosts a maximum of six guests and the emphasis is very much on activity and adventure in this pristine and beautiful environment.

Here are some other new camps/lodges in Zimbabwe to look out for and consider for your holiday:

Matusadona/Lake Kariba

Bumi-Hills-Safariimbabwe_Luxury-Safari-Lodge_Lake-View_Viewing-Deck_-African-Bush-Camps-88-1200x662Bumi Hills reopened in 2018 after an extensive refurbishment. There are ten suites with spectacular lake views. Lake cruises, walking safaris and game drives are all on the agenda. This is a stunning spot to simply relax and admire the colours changing over Lake Kariba. One of the highlights of any visit to Matusadona is learning about rhino conservation here and the background and success of the Intensive Rhino Protection Zone.  Other well-established options in the Lake Kariba/Matusadona area include Changa Safari Camp and Rhino Safari Camp.

Hwange

Verneys MachabaSafaris-verneys-camp-gallery-13Verney’s Camp is a new opening in Hwange and sits in a private concession within the south-eastern zone of the national park – a low traffic area. This classic tented camp, part of Machaba Safaris is an exciting prospect and offers eight tented rooms plus a further two family rooms. All tented rooms look out to the waterhole in front of the camp. Verney’s further strengthens the excellent camp offering in Hwange which can be reached very easily by road from Victoria Falls – the main gate is around a 2 1/2 hour drive away. There is also an airstrip for fly-in safari access,  but road transfers, especially if travelling in a group or as a family, give flexibility and allow you to have more freedom with your baggage! Fly in safaris impose very strict baggage guidelines!  Road transfers also help to keep the cost down while  allowing you to see more of the country. The Hide Hwange remains a favourite option with the waterhole very close to camp  along with Camp Hwange and Davison’s. African Bush Camps offer three high quality options with Somalisa, family friendly Somalisa Acacia and Somalisa Expedition. Some camps offer the chance to get a behind-the-scenes conservation experience with visits to the Painted Dog Conservation Centre or by joining a Hwange Pump Run. Find out more about Hwange here.

Victoria Falls

ZimZam slider shutterstock_129335261There are dozens of places to stay in Victoria Falls – you can stay in an economical  guesthouse in town,  a colonial grand hotel with lawns rolling virtually down to the Falls, a safari lodge or a river lodge. Victoria Falls is a great place to arrive and relax following an international flight. It’s a good destination for families with many exciting activities on offer, for example the Flying Fox or canopy tours. Victoria Falls combines brilliantly with a safari to Hwange since you can transfer easily and affordably by road, or with Chobe in Botswana. In the last year several new properties have opened around Victoria Falls.  At the top end is spectacular Mpala Jena from Great Plains.  Old Drift Lodge is also new, around 7km upstream of Victoria Falls on the banks of the Zambezi. The lodge is owned by Wild Horizons who also offer The Elephant Camp at Victoria Falls. The tented lodge opened in May 2018 so has had a season to settle in. There are 10 suites here plus an additional four family suites. As well as being able to enjoy river cruises and game drives on the banks of the Zambezi, guests are close enough to visit the Falls themselves and enjoy some of the many activities. Masuwe Lodge is in a similar location and has re-opened after extensive refurbishment. You can also stay on the Zambian side of the Falls – known for its beautiful river lodges – great places to kick back pre or post safari and to get out on the water, but you’ll have to wait to read the blog on Zambia…

Next week: why a holiday to Tanzania should be on your wish-list.

 

VIDEO: The Flight of Angels, Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls is one of the seven Natural Wonders of the World and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The massive Zambezi River falls over 108  metres (360 ft), with over 1,050 cubic metres of water per second racing over its lip when its in full flood. When visiting, from either the Zimbabwean or Zambian sites, its often hard to get a grasp on the scale of it. Vast clouds of spray rise up, soaking you in seconds and hiding areas of the Falls in mist.

With a total width of 1,706 metres (5,604 Ft) spread out in a large arc, its also impossible to get a vantage point from where it’s all visible. After the Falls, the river runs off in a deep cut canyon, racing away through a series of fast-moving rapids. From the ground you can only look from certain vantage points, like the iron bridge that links the two countries, completed in 1905, but get no idea of its course, how it twists and turns as it runs away.

A great way to see the Falls is on the Flight of Angels, a 10 minute helicopter. It gives a perspective of the vastness of the African landscape, the size of the Zambezi as it heads to the Falls, the amount of spray produced and a birds-eye perspective of the Zambezi gorges as they channel the water away.

Many of our clients who visit the Falls do the flight and love it. As well as great views its also exhilarating. This video was taken by Lily, one of our Senior African Consultants. We’ve left it unedited, running from lift-off to landing. You will see in the video that the helicopter circles the Falls twice, ensuring that whichever side of the helicopter you are on, you get a great view of the Falls in one direction, and views of the river, gorge, and Victoria Falls town on the other.

How many UNESCO World Heritage Sites are there in Africa?

UNESCO (The United Nation’s Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) runs a programme to protect and maintain places that are extremely important either for conservation of the environment or culturally important sites. These places are given UNESCO World Heritage Site status in order to protect them under international law and to be able to raise funds to help secure their protection for the future. There are currently 981 sites worldwide of which 759 are cultural and 193 are natural and 29 are both.

So how many are there in Africa? Well, there are an amazing 94 UNESCO World Heritage Sites and they range from all kinds of natural environment to incredible ancient cultural sites. Unsurprisingly really considering Africa is the birthplace of mankind and also home to some of the most diverse landscapes and wildlife on the planet.

In Southern Africa there are some incredible sites all worth visiting. In Zimbabwe you have Mana Pools National Park, the Great Zimbabwe Monument and of course shared with Zambia the world famous Mosi-oa-Tunya otherwise known as Victoria Falls. In South Africa you can visit various Humanid Fossil Sites or the stunning beautiful Drakensburg region. In Namibia there is the Namib Sand Sea with its enormous sand dunes and Twyfelfontein. In neighbouring Botswana its Tsodilo makes the list and in Malawi it’s the Lake Malawi National Park and the ancient rock art of Chongoni.

In Eastern Africa there are so many UNESCO World Heritage Sites you would have to return many times over to see them all. In Ethiopia there are the famous cultural sites of Lalibela, Aksum, the Omo Valley and Fasil Ghebbi in Gondar but did you know that the stunning Simien Mountains were also a world heritage site under UNESCO’s protection? Other cultural sites include Stone Town on Zanzibar, Fort Jesus in Mombasa, Lamu’s Old Town in Kenya and the rock art sites of Kondoa in Tanzania.

Of course East Africa is famous for its stunning scenery and much of this has world heritage status including the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti National Park, Selous Game Reserve and Kilimanjaro National Park – and that’s just Tanzania. In Kenya the Great Lake region of the Rift Valley, Lake Turkana National Park and Mount Kenya National Park are all protected with this status. Over in neighbouring Uganda the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park and the Rwenzori National Park are both world heritage sites as is the Virunga National Park in Rwanda. And last but not least one of our favourite destinations in Mozambique, the island of Mozambique itself has world heritage status.

In fact Africa has so many important sites that another umbrella group was set up to run the programme. The African World Heritage Fund (AWHF) is the first regional funding initiative within the framework of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention. Created in 2006 through a joint initiative by the Government of South Africa, the African Union and UNESCO, the African World Heritage Fund is an intergovernmental organization based in South Africa whose mission is to assist African countries in: increasing the number of African sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List, conserving and managing natural and cultural heritage, rehabilitating sites on the list of World Heritage in Danger, training heritage experts and site managers, and ensuring the participation of local communities in decisions concerning their heritage and to ensure that they receive tangible benefits from World Heritage. On Friday 31 January 2014, UNESCO joined forces with the African Union Commission to raise awareness and funds for the African World Heritage Fund (AWHF) during the African Union (AU) Heads of State luncheon at the AU Headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Participants pledged a total of three million US dollars in support of the AWHF Endowment Fund.

It is good to know that these amazing beautiful and historic places are being actively protected and that future generations will be able to enjoy them and learn from them as we have. The only problem I have is trying to decide which one to visit next……….

Posted by Ruth

Adrenaline junkies rush to do “the fall” at Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls has long been renowned for the adrenalin-fuelled activities on offer. You can leap from the bridge on one of the highest bungee jumps in the world. You can raft the white-water rapids, abseil and zip line through the sheer sided Bakota Gorge or jet boat the Zambezi. Now, however, a new craze is taking over, named simply “the fall”.

Pioneered on the Kawarau and Shotover rivers in New Zealand, it’s been brought to Zimbabwe by rafting specialists Wild White Water. “The idea came when I was on a roller-coaster ride at a park near Auckland,” WWW director Brad Haines explained. “I wondered whether I could combine the gut-wrenching excitement of the ride with the thrill of white water. It’s taken over three years to perfect, but it was worth the wait!”

So what is “the fall”? “It involved a high-tech piece of equipment called “the coffin”.“It’s a waterproof capsule, weighted at the bottom to float upright and with its own internal oxygen supply. The top is a high-impact Perspex dome. Inside it’s fitted with memory foam to fit itself exactly to the occupant’s body shape. We put you in and push you off.”

The ride starts just below the Falls when you are dropped into the water from a platform. The capsule is swept downstream, running three rapids before being recovered in a large river eddy where the current drops. The capsule is fitted with GPS so it can be tracked at all times in case it becomes snagged underwater or misses the recovery point.

“Its an awesome experience. You are underwater for about half the time, tossed and tumbled around and being so low in the water really gives you a feel for the speed and power of the water that surrounds you.”

The cost? Not cheap at US$395 per ride but a unique experience. And do they have any plans to ride the coffin over the Falls themselves?

“We’ve done the Christchurch Falls, but they are much smaller. There’s no reason not too, we just need the right conditions of enough water to give the depth but not too much to make it too turbulent. Watch this space, I’ll be the first to go.”

The Victoria Falls Bridge and the Zambezi Gorge